This episode is about: How early film experiences — Changed our lives – Filled us with wonder – Gave us meaning – Put us asleep and woke us up – Amazed our sox off  – Filled the lonely times of childhood – Taught us about love and how to be feminine and masculine – Showed us proper ways to act and to drive a wooden stakes into a vampire’s heart  – Showed us adventures we would never have lived ourselves.

Films talked about:

  • Gone with the Wind
  • Dracula
  • The Blog
  • How the West Was Won
  • Summer Magic
  • Pollyanna
  • Lost Continent
  • It’s a Wonderful Life
  • Sound of Music
  • To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Mary Poppins
  • A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum
  • The Producers
  • Winchester ’73
  • Alien (only briefly)

Oh, yeah — AND — about the coming Zombie Apocalypse <<< you do not want to miss this important information.

 

Going to U.S. Federal Prison for Planting Corn

Kathy Kelly has been in Federal Prison four times. Brian Terrell has spent more time in jail than in college and has learned more for it.  Becky and I spoke with these two “stars” in the field of Peace Activism at Gabriella’s Tequila Bar over wine and margaritas.  Becky had a serious ear ache and so drank water — poor baby.

 

 

Kathy and Brian were in town for a court hearing for an earlier action they held outside the U.S. Mission to the United Nations.  And – while they were in the City they gathered members of Voices for Creative Nonviolence to protest Lockheed Martin who produced the bomb that a Saudi plan dropped on a bus filled with Yemen children — dozens were killed outright,

These two amazingly dedicated people shared stories about how they got into activism and explained what these choices have meant to their lives.

Email us at barcrawlradio@gmail.com with comments about this and our other programs.

 

 

Photos by George de Castro-Day

5nap-becky-martyThis is our “other other” BCR episode — the one in which Becky and I just talk. We consider it a form of marriage counseling — you know — real talk — mature talk — deep listening — about those areas of our relationship that need to be investigated.

We talked about television.

This BCR episode was recorded at 5 Napkin Burger on Broadway and W. 84th Street.  Met the new manager — Julio — who treated your BCR hosts very well.  We followed the recording by sharing a fat 5N burger – onion rings — french fries.  We recommend — every so often.

And in case you are passing 5 Napkin Burger and see us recording — drop in and let us know what you think of our programming — OR — email us at barcrawlradio@gmail.com5Napkin-record here

BCR30-espinal-on-Glazer-show

Walking to the Greene Space with Raphael Espinal

Raphael Espinal is a 30-something NY City Council member from Brooklyn. We first invited him onto BCR when we learned about Raphael’s idea for a NYC Night Life Mayor,  and his work to end the city’s ancient Cabaret Laws that banned dancing at bars — BCR #6.

Then Raphael joined us for our “Margarita Crawl” — BCR #16 — to talk about his “ban plastic straws at bars” initiative.  Each time,  he was a delightful interview.  When we learned that he was running for NYC Public Advocate Raphael joined us again at Gebhard’s Beer Culture Bar — BCR #30.  Winson-Espinal-GreeneC

He promised us at the time that if he won he would return to the podcast for a follow-up –- Becky and I immediately became Espinal cheerleaders.  And anyway – he’s a good guy with great ideas.  So, we wanted to keep tabs on how he was doing with the race.

For this extra BCR podcast, Raphael and I talked as he moved from a downtown  Educational Alliance ‘meet the candidates’ event, to a show with Ilana Glazer at WNYC’s Greene Space.

It is a revealing conversation with a young politician trying to do the right thing for his city — and maybe a bit more.

Moving on Up …

This is our third BCR show with Brooklyn Council Member Raphael Espinal — at Gebhard’s Beer Culture Bar  on W. 72nd Street.

Our first conversation with this young politico was in BCR #6 to talk about his initiative BCR30-espinal-advocateto create the office of Night Life Mayor.  Then on BCR #16, Raphael joined us at Gabriella’s for our summertime ‘Margarita Crawl’ to talk about his ban on plastic straws.  Raphael joins us a third time to talk about his run for NYC Public Advocate.  We talked about his vision for the city and his early life growing up on tough Brooklyn streets.  He promised on the show that if he wins this prestigous position he will return to Bar Crawl Radio to report on the state of the city and what it’s like to be a big “macher” in the city that never sleeps.


See “BCR #30 Extra: Walking with a Young Politician” for a revealing conversation with Raphael Espinal — Brooklyn City Council Member — running for NYC Public Advocate.  I joined Raphael as he walked and subwayed to the Greene Space for an appearance on Ilana Glazer’s “Humanize Policy” show.

BCR goes SHORT-FORM

Becky and I are balanced, loving and lovely people who have no malice and hold no grudges  — and yet there are reality-based phenomenon that truly “tick” us off.

We invite any of our listeners to email us with what “pisses” you off — Email us BCR29-5-Cascabel-sepiaat barcrawlradio@gmail.com

This is our first recording at Cascabel Taqueria — a delightful margarita and fish tacos joint on Broadway and 108th Street,

This will be our first short-form BCR podcast. Just us. Just talking. Just for fun. Our new plan is to post every Friday — one week short and the next long-form shows.  Next week we will be talking with Rafael Espinal who is running for NYC Public Advocate — with a follow-up extra on Espinal’s adventures in WNYC’s Greene Space with Ilana Glazer.

“Is this who we are”? Friday’s actions.

A long march to the White House.  An anti-WAT protestor.  And the fast ends.

BCR29-WAT16-Friday-WHGuantanamo or Gitmo has held many hundreds of men accused of terrorism against the U.S. in connection with the 9/11 2001 attacks  – most were innocent of any crime – several dozen remain at the prison on the Cuban island. They have been imprisoned for 17 years in limbo — beyond judicial recognition.

“Is this who we are?”  is a podcast series reflecting the actions, arguments, and emotions of the WAT protesters who gathered for a week in 2019 in Washington. D.C. My name is Alan Winson.  I lived with the WAT members in the First Lutheran Trinity Church Hostel on E and 4th Streets – and followed their actions and talked with them.  For me – it was a formative experience.

In the end – WAT members held little hope that Guantanamo Prison would close in the near future.  They accepted that neither the news media nor those on the DC’s streets where they demonstrated and got arrested knew what they were doing – and yet they persisted in marching and fasting through those cold, windy, wet days.  To a great extent this series is about that hopeless struggle, and what buoyed them and what makes them important citizens of this flawed democracy.

“Is this Who We Are?” podcast series culminated in Bar Crawl Radio podcast #29 – recorded at the Iron Horse Tap Room on E and 7th Streets.  We talked with several of the Witness Against Torture protesters who reflected on their experiences of the week.


Witness Against Torture or WAT was formed in 2005 when 25 Americans attempted to visit the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.  In the years following, WAT has demonstrated to shut down Guantánamo.  Each year since then – These dogged civil protestors have carried out dozens of nonviolent actions to build awareness about the mental and physical torture of these men and to establish human ties with the prisoners at Guantánamo.

“Is this who we are”?  Thursday’s actions

Arrests at McConnell’s Office.BCR29-WAT15-McConnell

Guantanamo or Gitmo has held many hundreds of men accused of terrorism against the U.S. in connection with the 9/11 2001 attacks  – most were innocent of any crime – several dozen remain at the prison on the Cuban island. They have been imprisoned for 17 years in limbo — beyond judicial recognition.

“Is this who we are?”  is a podcast series reflecting the actions, arguments, and emotions of the WAT protesters who gathered for a week in 2019 in Washington. D.C. My name is Alan Winson.  I lived with the WAT members in the First Lutheran Trinity Church Hostel on E and 4th Streets – and followed their actions and talked with them.  For me – it was a formative experience.

In the end – WAT members held little hope that Guantanamo Prison would close in the near future.  They accepted that neither the news media nor those on the DC’s streets where they demonstrated and got arrested knew what they were doing – and yet they persisted in marching and fasting through those cold, windy, wet days.  To a great extent this series is about that hopeless struggle, and what buoyed them and what makes them important citizens of this flawed democracy.

“Is this Who We Are?” podcast series culminated in Bar Crawl Radio podcast #29 – recorded at the Iron Horse Tap Room on E and 7th Streets.  We talked with several of the Witness Against Torture protesters who reflected on their experiences of the week.


Witness Against Torture or WAT was formed in 2005 when 25 Americans attempted to visit the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.  In the years following, WAT has demonstrated to shut down Guantánamo.  Each year since then – These dogged civil protestors have carried out dozens of nonviolent actions to build awareness about the mental and physical torture of these men and to establish human ties with the prisoners at Guantánamo.

 

“Is this who we are?” – Wednesday’s actions.

Arrests at the Supreme Court.

Guantanamo or Gitmo has held many hundreds of men accused of terrorism against the U.S. in connection with the 9/11 2001 attacks  – most were innocent of any crime – several dozen remain at the prison on the Cuban island. They have been imprisoned for 17 years in limbo — beyond judicial recognition.

“Is this who we are?”  is a podcast series reflecting the actions, arguments, and emotions of the WAT protesters who gathered for a week in 2019 in Washington. D.C. My name is Alan Winson.  I lived with the WAT members in the First Lutheran Trinity Church Hostel on E and 4th Streets – and followed their actions and talked with them.  For me – it was a formative experience.BCR29-WAT14-Sherril

In the end – WAT members held little hope that Guantanamo Prison would close in the near future.  They accepted that neither the news media nor those on the DC’s streets where they demonstrated and got arrested knew what they were doing – and yet they persisted in marching and fasting through those cold, windy, wet days.  To a great extent this series is about that hopeless struggle, and what buoyed them and what makes them important citizens of this flawed democracy.

“Is this Who We Are?” podcast series culminated in Bar Crawl Radio podcast #29 – recorded at the Iron Horse Tap Room on E and 7th Streets.  We talked with several of the Witness Against Torture protesters who reflected on their experiences of the week.


Witness Against Torture or WAT was formed in 2005 when 25 Americans attempted to visit the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.  In the years following, WAT has demonstrated to shut down Guantánamo.  Each year since then – These dogged civil protestors have carried out dozens of nonviolent actions to build awareness about the mental and physical torture of these men and to establish human ties with the prisoners at Guantánamo.